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Physics students study the behavior of nature from the largest to the smallest scales, and from the fundamental to the immediately practical.

By discovering patterns in nature and exploring ways to explain them, the Department of Physics strives to prepare students to better understand the world around us.

What will be the ultimate fate of the universe? Why can some materials carry currents without resistance? How can we make images of nerve activity in the brain? Because physics is concerned with fundamental questions such as these, many ideas and tools developed by physicists are useful in other disciplines. An education in physics provides a strong background for careers in a vast number of science, engineering and medical fields.

Through curriculum that emphasizes hands-on experience with laboratory equipment and computer applications as well as the development of technical communication skills, physics majors gain extensive research experience in collaboration with faculty whose areas of expertise range from sub-atomic and dusty plasma physics to radio astronomy, electromagnetics and space physics, and more. Many students conduct additional research or participate in off-campus internships, and students regularly present their research at national and regional professional society meetings.

Many students who leave Wittenberg with a degree in physics continue their studies in graduate school. Others pursue careers in fields such as engineering, astronomy, computer science, law, business, medicine and education. Physicists have knowledge and skills that are applicable to a wide range of problems. Consequently, physicists are always in demand.

Program Mission Statement:

Wittenberg's physics program strives to provide a rigorous, flexible and effective curriculum for physics majors and minors, with sufficient depth of study for those students who expect to pursue physics, astronomy or engineering at the graduate level, or embark on technical careers; provide effective and relevant service courses for the many students whose majors or career goals require physics or astronomy courses; and provide effective and engaging courses for the many students who choose to take physics or astronomy courses as part of the breadth of a liberal arts education.

 

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